Pennsylvania Police Department launches see something say something app

Pennsylvania Police Department launches see something say something app

A new smartphone application has been developed to help the Pennsylvania State Police receive reports regarding suspicious activity that may be linked to terrorism. The new See Something, Send Something app allows suspicious activity to be captured as a photo or written note and sent to the Pennsylvania Criminal Intelligence Center (PaCIC).

The application, which is available at no cost for iPhone and Android phone users,also includes information on what to look for and when to report suspicious activity, along with how to receive important alerts. Other state organizations in urban areas have released similar applications. The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority offers one for transit riders that allows you to send reports or pictures anonymously. Both apps include live call buttons to alert police directly if needed.

The Pennsylvania app was created in partnership with My Mobile Witness, a private company that creates monitoring apps, some include the ability to capture video as well. The system allows the PaCIC to engage citizens without tracking location or storing of personal information. Submitted tips are immediately removed from the mobile device and purged from the My Mobile Witness system once delivered to the intelligence center for analysis.

The police department said in a statement that only reports that document behavior reasonably indicative of criminal activity related to terrorism will be shared with local, state and federal partners. They are encouraging users not to submit reports on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation or perceived ethnicity.

In addition to the new mobile app, people can call the toll-free State Police Terrorism Tip Line at 1-888-292-1919 or email to report suspicious individuals or activity.

“Prevention is everyone’s responsibility,” Noonan said. “We are one neighborhood, one state, one nation; and it is the responsibility of all to remain vigilant and to report suspicious behavior — one report can make a difference.”

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